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Thursday, May 21, 2015

Managing Oracle Database 12c with Enterprise Manager – Part XIV


We are discussing the management of Oracle Database 12c in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. In our previous blog post on this topic, we discussed the new Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c, which is the replacement for the earlier Database Control (used in previous versions of the Oracle database such as 11g and 10g, to manage a single database).
One of the menu options in Database Express 12c is the Database Performance Hub. This gives a single view of DB performance - including ADDM, SQL Tuning, Real-Time SQL Monitoring, and ASH Analytics. It supports both a real-time & historical mode. There is a dedicated tab for RAC, if a RAC database is being used. It also has a historical view of SQL Monitoring reports.
Select Performance.. Performance Hub from the Database Express menu, the following page appears:
At the top, you can slide and select the time of interest. The information in the graphs below the slider changes accordingly. You can see the CPU load at the Host level, the total memory used by the database and its breakdown, the IO requests, and the Active sessions, foreground and background.
Before moving to the other tabs, click on the top PerfHub Report. This shows:
This is an Active Report that you are generating to hand over to your developers, so select the third option – All, which will save all the details including SQL statements.
The data is retrieved for the Active report, this takes a minute or so, and then the collection is completed.
Save the Active report as a file “perfhub_rt_10190900.html”. When you open up this file, the performance hub is seen as saved as a whole, including the various tabs.
Here we have moved to the Activity tab, which we will discuss in the next blog post.
This blog spot was originally published at this link.

Managing Oracle Database 12c with Enterprise Manager – Part XIII - Database Express 12c


We are discussing the management of Oracle Database 12c in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. In our previous blog post on this topic, we briefly looked at the changes for Metering and Chargeback. We will now look at the new Database Express 12c.
Oracle Database 12c introduces “Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c” instead of Enterprise Manager Database Control that was available with previous versions of the database, such as 11g and 10g. The important thing to remember is that both Database control, and Database Express, can only be used to manage a single database as opposed to Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control.
As we can see, Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c provides basic administrator support for storage management(tablespaces, archive logs, control files, redo logs, undo tablespaces), security management (users, roles profiles),configuration management (initialization parameters, memory, database properties, feature usage), and performance diagnostics and tuning (Performance Hub and SQL Tuning Advisor).
For licensing purposes, the performance components require the Diagnostics and Tuning pack for Database 12c Enterprise Edition (EE). However the basic administration pieces can be used for free and also are accessible in Database 12c Standard Edition (SE).
Database Express 12c supports single instance or RAC databases, and Standard Edition (SE) or Enterprise Edition (EE). Since the administration activities supported are basic, the DBA will need to use a centralized Enterprise Manager Cloud Control installation for more advanced DBA activities on the database – such as setting up RMAN backups, Data Guard standbys, Database Resource Manager, Data Redaction and so on. These tasks obviously cannot be performed in Database Express 12c.
Database Express 12c can be installed along with the database (such as when the database is created using the Database Configuration Assistant (dbca)), in the same manner as Database Control 11g/10g. However, the difference between Database Control and Database Express, is that the latter runs inside the database and there are no extra Middleware components installed on the database server. The XDB server inside the database is used for web services. This itself is a welcome change.
Due to the improved and streamlined architecture, the disk space used is approximately only 20MB or so, and the CPU and memory overhead is also greatly reduced. 100% of the UI rendering for the screens is performed in the browser, and the database server only runs SQL - in contrast to the previous version of Database Control.
In the next blog post, we will take a closer look at the Database Performance Hub component of Database Express 12c.
This blog spot was originally published at this link.

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Managing Oracle Database 12c with Enterprise Manager – Part XII


We are discussing the management of Oracle Database 12c in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. In our previous blog post on this topic, we looked at how the Self-Service console would appear to the Self-Service Application (SSA) user, with the ability to provision databases, schemas or PDBs on the fly.
Metering and Chargeback is an important feature of the cloud. Due to the agile self-service nature of the cloud, it is important to set up quotas for the consumers, as well as meter the usage of the cloud, and use calculated dollar costs for showback or chargeback, so that the cloud is not exploited by over-usage by the consumers. This would also serve as a way for an internal IT department to show its value to the other business units, by putting an internal cost to its services – at least for showback purposes.
The “Chargeback and Capacity Planning Plug-in 12.1.0.4” (from EM12c Release 3) started to provide support for Oracle Pluggable Databases (12c PDBs). This enabled the Chargeback administrator to add a Container Database (CDB) to Chargeback, and assign each Pluggable Database (PDB) individually to a cost center.
This plug-in is now renamed to the latest available “Oracle Consolidation Planning and Chargeback 12.1.0.6” as can be seen via Setup.. Extensibility.. Plug-ins from the Enterprise Manager console.
A friend recently asked me: “Can I use showback / chargeback for an already existent database, that is, without the need to create a database as a service?”
My answer was that you cannot use chargeback unless you fully license the DBLM pack and Cloud Management pack and add the database as a resource to a zone with a charge plan. You don’t need to set up the full Database-as-a-service and enable self-service, it will just calculate the usage for an existing database if it is added in this way.
For more information on setting up chargeback, refer to the documentation here.
This blog post was originally published at this link.

Managing Oracle Database 12c with Enterprise Manager – Part XI


We are discussing the management of Oracle Database 12c in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. In our previous blog post on this topic, we looked at “Database as a Service” and “Schema-as-a-Service”, and also talked about “Pluggable database (PDB) as a Service (PDBaaS)”.
The “Schema as a Service” capability was introduced since the Cloud plug-in “Enterprise Manager for Oracle Cloud (SSA) 12.1.0.5”. The renamed plug-in “Oracle Cloud Application 12.1.0.7” was later released in October 2013. This added the capability of the Pluggable Database as a Service, i.e. PDBaaS.
Note that the current plug-in version available is Oracle Cloud Application 12.1.0.8. To check your version, go to Setup.. Extensibility.. Plug-ins from the Enterprise Manager console.  
If your plug-in version is not equivalent to the above, you may need to update your plug-in using Setup.. Extensibility.. Self Update. For more information on the self update process, please see the documentation here. You will need to be on Enteprrise Manager 12c Release 4 (12.1.0.4) in order to use the latest plug-in. If you are on an earlier release of Enterprise Manager, you will not be able to update the plug-in to the latest version.
The final aim of the Cloud Administrator, on setting up the database pools, service catalog, quotas and chargeback plans, is to provide the self-service capability to the SSA (Self-Service Application) user as can be seen below – the ability to ask for and get databases, schemas and PDBs via self-service.

More in the next blog post. 
This blog post was originally published at this link.

Managing Oracle Database 12c with Enterprise Manager – Part X - Database as a Service

We are discussing the management of Oracle Database 12c in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. In our previous blog post on this topic, we looked at the Database Resource Manager and how it can be used to control resources at the PDB level in Database 12c.
Let us now look at how Enterprise Manager’s “Database as a Service (DBaaS)” capability works with Database 12c and its container and pluggable databases.
With Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c, the Cloud Administrator is able to set up and offer the self-service of virtual machines (Oracle VM) with databases – this being more of an infrastructure cloud or Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), since virtual machines are being provisioned on the fly.
The Cloud Administrator is also able to set up and offer the self-service creation of single-instance or RAC databases on existing Oracle Homes in what is known as a database pool for databases, or alternatively the self-service creation of schemas in an existing single-instance or RAC database in what is known as a database pool for schemas.
This self-service capability can also be called “Database as a Service” and “Schema-as-a-Service” respectively.
With the addition of Database 12c, the additional capability shown in the illustration above is the self-service creation of PDBs, in an existing single instance or RAC Container database (CDB). This is what we now call a database pool for PDBs. This self-service capability can be called as “Pluggable database (PDB) as a Service (PDBaaS)”.
Using this capability, the Cloud Self-Service Access (SSA) users are now able to self-service the provisioning of Pluggable databases inside a Container database very easily. This is the next stage of the Private Database Cloud.
For licensing aspects, as far as DBaaS is concerned, the Cloud Management Pack for Oracle database is required, with the pre-requisite of the Database Lifecycle Management (DBLM) pack – this is the pack that does all of the provisioning under the hood, whereas the Cloud Management pack adds the capabilities of self-service, quotas, chargeback/showback and so on.
This blog post was originally published at this link.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Managing Oracle Database 12c with Enterprise Manager – Part IX


We are discussing the management of Oracle Database 12c via Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. In our previous blog post on this topic, we looked at how easy it was to set up Oracle Data Redaction for a 12c database using Enterprise Manager - this capability being used to hide confidential data on the fly as it is being displayed.
We will now look at the Database Resource Manager and its new capabilities to handle PDBs in Database 12c, and how it can be set up via Enterprise Manager.
Drill down to the 12c Database target in Enterprise Manager. From the home page of the database, open the Administration menu and choose Resource Manager. The Resource Manager Home page is displayed.
As can be seen, the Database Resource Manager is now CDB aware and allows you to create CDB Resource plans. This will control resources to Pluggable databases inside the CDB. Drill down to the CDB resource plans, this displays the following screen.
Click on “Edit” to define the CDB Resource Plan.

In the Resource Plan, by default, all the PDBs have a “share” of one (1) . There are three PDBs in this container database, as displayed on this page - “PDB(3)”. Therefore, each PDB has a share of 33%. 
You can add a separate Resource Allocation by clicking on the “Add/Remove” button.
Here we have added PDB3 as a separate entry with 2 shares to the Resource Allocation. The remaining PDBs have 1 share each.  This means 50% is the Resource Allocation of PDB3, and the other two PDBs have 25% each. This can be used to cover a scenario where PDB3 is an important application’s pluggable database, and more resources are required to be allocated to this pluggable database.
We are also activating this plan with a simple tick mark on this page. Click on Apply. And we haven’t written a single line of PL/SQL code (which is normally required to define a resource plan if not using Enterprise Manager).
For more detailed information on the powerful capabilities of the Oracle Database Resource Manager, please refer to the chapter “Managing Resources with Oracle Database Resource Manager” in the 12c Database Admin guide.
In the next blog post, we will look at more management aspects of Oracle database 12c using Enterprise Manager, in particular the ability to self-service the creation of PDBs using “Pluggable database (PDB) as a Service (PDBaaS)” – a form of Database as a Service.
This blog post was originally posted at this link.

Managing Oracle Database 12c with Enterprise Manager – Part VIII


We are discussing the management of Oracle Database 12c in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. In our previous blog post on this topic, we started to look at Data Redaction, and created a Policy on the HR user and Salary column. We specified Full Redaction as seen below, to hide all the Salary column figures (a zero will be displayed).


Click on “Show SQL”, this displays the PL/SQL code that is generated to create the Data Redaction policy. Even this simple example demonstrates how Enterprise Manager saves a lot of admin time, since it writes the PL/SQL code for the DBA. Fancy writing this manually?

The policy is created successfully. We can see that the policy is “enabled” and there is one redacted column.

So, the Data Redaction Policy has been created successfully and enabled. But how do we verify this? 
From now on, any select statement issued by a non-SYSDBA should show the salary as zero (0) in each case.  This can be seen below in SQL Plus, logging in as the HR database user:

[oracle@db12c admin]$ sqlplus hr/@pdb3
SQL>  select * from employees;
NAME                                     DEPARTMENT               SALARY             JOINDATE
John Smith                            Science                           0                          01-MAR-13
Simon Pereira                        Commerce                      0                          01-APR-13

Whereas, if you login as sysdba, you can see the salary values  since no redaction is applied.

[oracle@db12c admin]$ sqlplus sys@pdb3 as sysdba
SQL>  select * from hr.employees;
NAME                                     DEPARTMENT               SALARY             JOINDATE
John Smith                            Science                           200000                01-MAR-13
Simon Pereira                        Commerce                     500000                01-APR-13

If the concept of Oracle Data Redaction interests you, then you can read further about it in the documentation here.
In the next blog post, we will look at how the Resource Manager can be set up for 12c Databases, via the powerful and time-saving interface of Enterprise Manager 12c.
This blog post was originally posted at this link.

Disclaimer

Opinions expressed in this blog are entirely the opinions of the writers of this blog, and do not reflect the position of Oracle corporation. No responsiblity will be taken for any resulting effects if any of the instructions or notes in the blog are followed. It is at the reader's own risk and liability.

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